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Second Public History Encounter

At  CegeSoma, 20 March 2019 (12:30 – 14:00)
The impact of the first World War in a colonial context
Conference (in French) with Anne Cornet and Enika Ngongo


With the end of the commemorations of the First World War, we can make one observation : the overseas colonies, which played a considerable historic role in this conflict, were nevertheless relatively absent in all the initiatives of the last four years.
 
On March 20, CegeSoma gives the floor to two Africa-specialists to put into perspective the different challenges of that historic era and the consequences of the First World War on local populations.


 

 'Nyanza. A visit of the royal commissioner'.  #CRLF#Photographer Ernest Gourdinne, Office colonial,   #CRLF#© Collection MRAC Tervuren, photo AP.0.1.7180.  #CRLF#
'Nyanza. A visit of the royal commissioner'.
Photographer Ernest Gourdinne, Office colonial,
© Collection MRAC Tervuren, photo AP.0.1.7180.
Shortly after the Belgian Congo entered the war, the Ministries of Colonies and Foreign Affairs, then in exile, already planned ahead with regard to potential territorial gains that Belgium could gain from its military involvement in Africa. The objective was to conquer neighbouring territories in German East Africa so that Belgium might exchange them, during the post-war negotiations, for territories located along the Atlantic Ocean.
 'The Belgian army has carried out four glorious African campaigns'.  #CRLF#Brussels, Imprimerie-Lithographie Ch. Bullens & Cie,   #CRLF#© Collection MRAC Tervuren, HO.1981.1.148.    #CRLF#
'The Belgian army has carried out four glorious African campaigns'.
Brussels, Imprimerie-Lithographie Ch. Bullens & Cie,
© Collection MRAC Tervuren, HO.1981.1.148.

 
 
However, in 1919, Belgium was only able to gain the mandate-territories of Ruanda-Urundi.

What happened that Belgium's ambitions were so significantly reduced?


In Rwanda, the end of the war was marked by a military occupation lasting several years, then by the establishment of an administration system presented as independent, but in reality strongly influenced by the colonial model of the Belgian Congo.
Local authorities had to accept new functions or were excluded from power entirely.


New types of rules and labor chores were imposed on the population, all of which led to a system of  colonization that went much further than that of the German predecessor.  
 

Our Guests : 
     

  Anne Cornet is a senior researcher at the Royal Museum for Central Africa and guest lecturer at the University of Namur.                  
She is the author of several books and articles on the social and visual history of colonization in Central Africa.  
  Enika Ngongo is a doctoral student in contemporary history at the University Saint-Louis – Brussels.
Attaché at the Centre de recherches en histoire du droit, des institutions et de la société (CRHiDI), she is writing a PhD on the Belgian Congo during the First World War.
 

 

This 'Public History Encounter' in French will take place in the CegeSoma conference room (Square de l'Aviation 29 – 1070 Bruxelles) and will be followed by a debate.
 
Please register beforehand (isabelle.ponteville@arch.be ou  02.556.92.11) and specify whether or not you opt for the light catering package* + indicate your choice (5 euros to be paid in advance on the account of CegeSoma: IBAN: BE12 6792 0045 0092 - BIC: PCHQBEBB + in communication: surname and first name)
 
*Option 1 : Organic raisin and walnut flute, Brie (+plain water, sparkling water or orange juice)
*Option 2 : Organic brioche bread, ham, egg mimosa, salad (+plain water, sparkling water or orange juice)
 
Feel free to bring friends and family!
 

 

 

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